P25 CAP AP Seeks Nominations to Fill Seat on Advisory Panel

On October 1, 2018, DHS S&T published a 30 Day Federal Register Notice seeking nominations to fill an open seat on the Project 25 Compliance Assessment Program (P25 CAP) Advisory Panel (AP). The P25 CAP AP members provide the views of active local, state, tribal, territorial and federal government users of portable, handheld, mobile vehicle-mounted radios and infrastructure, including repeaters, consoles and gateways.

The P25 CAP AP provides recommendations to S&T for strategic direction of the P25 CAP, addresses user input to improve the P25 CAP compliance process and provides feedback to P25 standards committees. The notice can be found here: https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2018/10/01/2018-21241/office-for-interoperability-and-compatibility-seeks-nominations-for-the-project-25-compliance.

All expressions of interest and nominations should be submitted to P25CAP@hq.dhs.gov. Please note that the 30 day notice will close on October 31, 2018.

Snapshot: Public Safety Agencies Pilot AI to Aid in First Response

Snapshot: Public Safety Agencies Pilot Artificial Intelligence to Aid in First Response

10/16/2018 09:05 AM EDT

Imagine a first responder answering the call to a natural disaster, a house fire, or an active shooter incident where there may be multiple injuries and unknown casualties. The information the responder needs to fulfill the mission is immeasurable. When you also consider the volume of data they receive from other responders, dispatch, command centers, victims, and onlookers while receiving and relaying information to medical personnel, it becomes clear that responders have to synthesize a large amount of life-saving information in a short amount of time. This can lead to information overload.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T)’s Next Generation First Responder Apex program (NGFR) partnered with the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to address this capability gap and develop the Assistant for Understanding Data through Reasoning, Extraction, and Synthesis (AUDREY). AUDREY is a state-of-the-art human-like reasoning system designed to assist first responders in synthesizing high-level data while at the scene of an emergency. DHS S&T began the AUDREY software pilot at the Multi Agency Communications Center (MACC) in Grant County, Washington, in the fall of 2017 and will pilot AUDREY at the Hastings-Quinte Paramedic Services in Ontario, Canada in early 2019.

Similar to the voice-activated device on a smartphone or the voice-controlled intelligent personal assistant available to the public, AUDREY is personalized to the individual responder and has the capability to recognize first responder specialized language. However, unlike the artificial general intelligence (AGI) systems available to the general public, AUDREY uses bio-inspired neural symbolic processing for cognitive reasoning. In other words, AUDREY leverages human intelligence and collects data to achieve better machine intelligence and provides insight that first responders may not have in the crucial moments of an emergency.

“AUDREY learns, analyzes, reasons, predicts, collaborates, and provides data fusion to provide direction for first responders on the scene,” said Dr. Edward Chow, manager of the Civil Programs Office at NASA JPL. “In other words, AUDREY has the potential to serve as a sort of guardian angel for first responders while responding to an emergency.”

As demonstrated in Next Generation First Responder video released last spring, AUDREY provides situational awareness during an incident, connecting first responders across different agencies with vital information right at their fingertips.

“AUDREY provides the kind of information at an incident that may not be readily apparent to even the most seasoned first responder,” said S&T’s NGFR Director John Merrill, DHS S&T AUDREY program manager.

“AUDREY’s purpose is to aid responders in taking all of the pertinent data related to an incident and making quicker decisions. In turn, this not only helps first responders save lives, but also keeps them better protected,” Merrill concluded.

At the MACC in Grant County, Washington, Technical Services Manager Dean Hane anticipates AUDREY will aid in caller and data information gathering as well as serve as a tool in synthesizing caller information from text-to-911.

“The major priority for dispatchers across the nation is to get a call out faster and more accurately to our first responders out in the field,” said Hane. “We believe AUDREY will be a tool we’ll use to gather information and data collection processes and to speed up our response.”

With the onset of text-to-911 services available in many dispatch centers across the country, many in the industry believe the future of 911 dispatch will be phone applications developed for the public to report more detailed information from an incident. Currently, the MACC offers the text-to-911 service and anticipates that evolution.

“Certainly, there will be a variety of unanticipated standards and data that will be collected from that kind of technology that we would need a tool like AUDREY to synthesize,” said Hane. “AUDREY will be that peek into the future – and we’re excited that we’ll be at the onset to crack open that door.”

Hane explained that while many are excited about the prospect of AUDREY’s ability to streamline dispatch, some are apprehensive that AGI may eventually take their jobs. However, Hanes assures, “Dispatchers don’t need to worry about AGI taking their jobs.

“Nothing can ever take the place of human intuition. There are instances where a caller may disguise their distress, in the example of domestic abuse. Trained dispatchers are able to distinguish cues that AI cannot,” Merrill stressed.

“AUDREY was created to learn with first responders and supplement their decisions while out in the field. There is no replacement for human intuition,” said Merrill.

Currently, the MACC is in the midst of gathering data to input into the AUDREY platform for their demonstration in the fall.

For Doug Socha, chief paramedic with the Hastings-Quinte Paramedic services, piloting a system like AUDREY seems like the natural next step in next generation first responder technology.

“Our services have been very progressive in advancing technology and trying to support paramedics in providing the best patient outcome possible. We’re always looking to try to advance tools and give paramedics the ability to do their job in those highly critical situations,” said Socha.

Socha was introduced to AUDREY through the established partnership between DHS S&T and Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) during the CAUSE IV interoperability experiment.

“When I first heard about AUDREY’s capabilities to support responders with instant decision-making, I saw an opportunity where this type of AI can benefit paramedics from a health care system point of view,” said Socha. “The ability to have paramedics check on medication or relay information to hospitals that could save them time, can help paramedics focus more on patient care.”

Socha explained that often, paramedics’ ability to treat patients on the spot is limited because they must call and consult physicians before taking the next steps in treatment.

“We lose crucial seconds when we could be saving lives,” said Socha.

Grant County’s Multi Agency Communication Center (MACC) will provide feedback and demo AUDREY’s integration with first responder communications by late fall 2018. The AUDREY pilot with Hastings-Quinte paramedic services will begin in early 2019.

Topics: First Responders, Science and Technology
Keywords: Artificial Intelligence, data, First Responder, News, R&D, Science and Technology

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Preview YouTube video Next Generation First Responder

Next Generation First Responder

 

Nominations to Fill Open Seat on P25 CAP Advisory Panel

SAFECOM members,

On October 1, 2018, DHS S&T published a 30 Day Federal Register Notice seeking nominations to fill an open seat on the Project 25 Compliance Assessment Program (P25 CAP) Advisory Panel (AP). The P25 CAP AP members provide the views of active local, state, tribal, territorial and federal government users of portable, handheld, mobile vehicle-mounted radios and infrastructure, including repeaters, consoles and gateways. The P25 CAP AP provides recommendations to S&T for strategic direction of the P25 CAP, addresses user input to improve the P25 CAP compliance process and provides feedback to P25 standards committees. The notice can be found here: https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2018/10/01/2018-21241/office-for-interoperability-and-compatibility-seeks-nominations-for-the-project-25-compliance.

All expressions of interest and nominations should be submitted to P25CAP@hq.dhs.gov. Please note that the 30 day notice will close on October 31, 2018.

 

Webinar: Connecting Emergency Management Agencies and Water Utilities

DHS Emergency Services Sector
and
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
present a webinar on
Connecting Emergency Management Agencies and Water Utilities
Webinar Date:
October 18, 2018
1-2 pm Eastern
On October 18, the National Information Sharing Consortium will be hosting a webinar with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Emergency Services Sector-Specific Agency (ESS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Connecting Emergency Management Agencies and Water Utilities.
The webinar will discuss how emergency management agencies and water utilities can increase preparedness and help ensure that communities have essential drinking water and wastewater services during emergencies. The webinar will highlight key actions that emergency management agencies and water utilities can take to build relationships, coordinate planning, share emergency capabilities, develop joint messages, and issue access cards. The webinar will also include some case study examples of how robust partnerships between emergency management agencies and water utilities have improved planning and response efforts.
The DHS ESS/EPA webinar is the fourteenth webinar in the NISC’s Mission-Focused Job Aids Webinar Series that reviews tools, techniques, and standard operating procedures that NISC partners in the homeland security, emergency management, public safety, first responder, and healthcare preparedness communities use to facilitate and manage information sharing. For more information about the webinars series and the NISC, visit the NISC website at www.nisconsortium.org. To become a member of the NISC, click hereto join, membership is free for all users!
Speakers
Sean McSpaden
Executive Director
National Information Sharing Consortium
Lauren Wisniewski
Environmental Engineer
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Nushat Dyson
Team Leader
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
The NISC’s Mission
We bring together data owners, custodians, and users from all public safety fields and all sectors to leverage efforts to improve information sharing. We aim to help save lives, better protect property, and build a safer, more secure nation.

 

Public Television Delivers First-Ever Earthquake Early Warning In Under Three Seconds

Successful Field Trial Shows Why More than 96 Percent of Californians Support Public Broadcasting’s Role in Earthquake Alerts

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA AND WASHINGTON, D.C., October 9, 2018 – The first-ever earthquake early warning in under three seconds was successfully delivered three weeks ago, on September 18, 2018, during a field trial by KVIE, the public television station based in Sacramento, California. Four other California public broadcasting stations will soon be testing public television’s datacasting system for earthquake early warnings: KPBS (San Diego), KQED (San Francisco), PBS SoCal (Los Angeles) and Valley PBS (Fresno).

“KVIE was honored to partner with Cal OES to conduct this critical field trial of earthquake early warnings in California,” said David Lowe, president and general manager of KVIE. “This work is part of KVIE’s commitment to public service and public safety. We are proud to work with the state of California to help alert first responder agencies and the public of a pending earthquake, where seconds matter and lives are at stake.”

“Public broadcasters in California are true pioneers in public safety, demonstrating the lifesaving power of public television’s datacasting infrastructure,” said Patrick Butler, president and chief executive officer of America’s Public Television Stations (APTS). “This field trial shows that public television can deliver the fastest ever earthquake alerts and warnings — in less than three seconds — the first time this dramatic new standard has ever been achieved. (The previous standard was 30 seconds.) When an earthquake hits, every second counts. We are proud to partner with local law enforcement and first responder agencies, especially Cal OES, to use the power of public television to keep all Americans safe.”

America’s Public Television Stations (APTS) and Eagle Hill Consulting have been working with the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES) and California public television stations on a multi-year project to develop a robust high-speed data delivery capacity for time-sensitive earthquake early warnings in California’s most populated areas. The California Earthquake Early Warning System (CEEWS) is comprised of seismic sensors, data processing centers, and end-user distribution mechanisms to warn individuals, institutions and infrastructure operators of impending shaking once an earthquake is detected. Continue reading

Tennessee Dept of Safety and Homeland Security Grants Tennessee Public Television $2 Million for Datacasting Pilot Project

MEMPHIS – The Tennessee Department of Safety and Homeland Security is making a $2 million grant to Tennessee’s Public Television Stations to fund a pilot project that will deliver private, secure communication between first responders and their management teams in case of an emergency or natural disaster, according to Commissioner David W. Purkey.

 Arnold Hooper, Tennessee’s Wireless Communications Director for the Department of Safety and Homeland Security, says the grant will be used to install datacasting equipment and software that will leverage a portion of the broadcast transmission of each Tennessee public television station to deliver encrypted public safety video, files, alerts and other data along with regular programming. This new capability will allow public safety agencies to benefit from the existing infrastructure, licensed spectrum and ability to securely deliver content anywhere in the state to an unlimited number of specifically targeted receivers. All public safety content is secure and can only be accessed by personnel who have the credentials and receive equipment. The project will be completed in a 30 month timeline with initial stations being tested and placed into operation within six months of the grant. This first statewide datacasting system will be a model for regional and even national deployments in the future.

Using the datacasting capability and fiber connections already in place among the six Tennessee Public Television Stations, communication between police, fire, medical and government personnel can be targeted within the areas affected by a severe, life-threatening emergency or natural disaster. The six TN stations are Memphis (WKNO), Martin/Lexington/Jackson (WLJT), Nashville (WNPT), Cookeville (WCTE), Knoxville/Sneedville (East TN PBS) and Chattanooga (WTCI). Continue reading

Andy Seybold’s Public Safety Advocate, October 4, 2018

T-Band Revisited, New FirstNet Authority CEO. Just to refresh your memories, the T-Band is the 470–512-MHz spectrum that was allocated to UHF-TV channels 14-20 that has since been made available to both public safety and, in some areas, business Land Mobile Radio (LMR) users. This was implemented in a Federal Communications Commission (FCC) action in 1971 and today there are eleven major metro areas that make use of the T-Band.

When Congress passed the bill authorizing FirstNet it included other provisions as well. One of these was that the T-Band would be available for spectrum auction nine years after the bill was signed. Once the auctions were over, the public safety community would have to vacate the spectrum within another two years. Those in Congress who added this provision to the bill indicated they had to have a “give-back” of some type to help them justify the release of ten additional megahertz of 700-MHz spectrum for public safety. It was not clear in the law who would pay for T-Band users to move off the T-Band nor where the FCC would find spectrum to accommodate them.

Some in Congress at the time FirstNet was passed into law believed FirstNet would be able to absorb all of the existing LMR users in these eleven metro areas. However, as of today, FirstNet is not ready to take over complete public safety-grade services including off-network voice communications and other functions needed by first responders. Therefore, as the deadline approaches, efforts to have Congress review and rescind this portion of the law have been stepped up.

Read the Entire Post Here

Here are the articles I have selected with the help of Discovery Patterns artificial intelligence. Continue reading